The two-brain approach: how can mutually interacting brains teach us something about social interaction?

Measuring brain activity simultaneously from two people interacting is intuitively appealing if one is interested in putative neural markers of social interaction. However, given the complex nature of interactions, it has proven difficult to carry out two-person brain imaging experiments in a methodologically feasible and conceptually relevant way. Only a small number of recent studies have put this into practice, using fMRI, EEG, or NIRS. Here, we review two main two-brain methodological approaches, each with two conceptual strategies. The first group has employed two-brain fMRI recordings, studying (1) turn-based interactions on the order of seconds, or (2) pseudo-interactive scenarios, where only one person is scanned at a time, investigating the flow of information between brains.

Link: http://bit.ly/2FeWcYB

Christian Hoffeldt

About Christian Hoffeldt

Talent Scout, Human Resource Management, Talent Management , Learning & Development, Organizational Development, Change Management, Psychology, Neuropsychology.

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